Coffee Recipe of the week: V60 for one, brewing sweet cup with medium body

Friday here, friends, and here is the Recipe of the Week series, with me once again sharing with you the ways I am brewing V60.

This time it is all about the timing and the ratio of the pours, as we are going to be brewing for a certain cup profile. When I say it I mean that you actually can control to a certain degree such parameters as body, clarity, acidity and sweetness simply by the way how you are brewing.

Of course it will not magically make your coffee taste completely differently, because there are still many other factors as variety, processing, roast profile, water compositions, etc – but still, you can definitely do some magic with the brewing as well.

This week I am brewing a classical 20/300 (1:15) ratio V60 just for one person, and my goal is to make it sweet, yet with medium to light body. Sometimes you just know you want it, so why not.

So, let’s do it!

YOU GONNA NEED

  • 20 grams of coffee ( in my case I was using freshly roasted washed Colombian)
  • 300 grams of water (I used Portuguese tap water, filtered by Peak Water from 250 ppm to 60 ppm, slightly lower than I would usually do)
  • water right after boiling (all way through, and slurry temperature of the brew is not dropping lower than 84ºC)
  • grind size – 21A at Baratza Sette, filter burrs (grind size – medium-coarse)
  • ceramic V60 size 2 (using ceramic is extremely important)
  • regular Hario paper filters
  • scales

V60 for sweet cup with medium body

  • Pre-heat the V60 (filter in) with lots of hot water. Start brewing 1 minute after pre-heating.
  • 20 grams of coffee
  • Add 70 grams of water (3.5 times the weight of coffee), finish pouring at 00:15.
  • At 00:30 add extra water to make it 140 grams in total
  • At 1:15 in one long slow spiral pour add all the water to make it 300 grams – finish pouring by 2:00
  • Draw-down should be finished by 2:15-2:30
  • And here you go – the first two pours contribute to the sweetness of the cup, and one long last pour – doesn’t allow the body to become too heavy.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s